The Washington Post Publishes ‘Donald Trump Style Guide’ After Having Press Credentials Revoked By Trump

The Washington Post Publishes ‘Donald Trump Style Guide’ After Having Press Credentials Revoked By Trump

The Washington Post has published a satirical piece on how news organisations should report on Donald Trump following Trump’s banning of The Post from events.

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

On Monday US time, Trump banned the media outlet from attending his events after saying the paper writes “untruthful stories” about his campaign.

Trump told a conference on Monday, and wrote on his Facebook page, that the press credentials of the publication would be revoked.

“I said, why should I have people, following me around, sitting up there like bigshots and they write very untruthful stories,” Trump said at the conference.

“So I did it with The Washington Post and I’m so happy.”

His Facebook post read: “Based on the incredibly inaccurate coverage and reporting of the record setting Trump campaign, we are hereby revoking the press credentials of the phony and dishonest Washington Post.”

The Washington Post now joins a growing list of publications that have had their press credentials revoked by Trump. The Post’s executive editor Martin Baron said he was proud of the coverage and that the paper will continue to cover the election.

“Donald Trump’s decision to revoke The Washington Post’s press credentials is nothing less than a repudiation of the role of a free and independent press,” he said in a statement on The Washington Post.

“When coverage doesn’t correspond to what the candidate wants it to be, then a news organisation is banished.

The Post will continue to cover Donald Trump as it has all along — honourably, honestly, accurately, energetically and unflinchingly. We’re proud of our coverage, and we’re going to keep at it.”

The Post has since published a rather satirical piece for other news organisations on how to appropriately report on Trump.

It includes sarcastic advice such as “Donald Trump is never wrong” and “his hair is real”.

One of the points from opinion writer Alexandra Petri says: “Style is as important as substance. A good post about Donald Trump includes at least one of the following words: ‘huge,’ ‘great,’ ‘manly,’ ‘terrific,’ ‘incredible,’ ‘fantastic,’ ‘remarkable,’ ‘big’/’bigly,’ ‘immense,’ ‘girthy,’ ‘magisterial,’ ‘gargantuan,’ ‘tumescent.’ Ideally, this word would be in the headline.

“A bad post about Donald Trump includes the words or phrases ‘puny,’ ‘dangerous,’ ‘Godwin’s law,’ ‘cocktail shrimp in a toupee,’ ‘husk of dead skin and hyperbole,’ ‘garbage fart,’ ‘what results if you accidentally leave Guy Fieri in a microwave.’”

Another section in the Frequently Asked Questions about reporting on Trump, Petri penned:

“Q: Can I just print a transcript of what Donald Trump actually said?

“A: No. This is very mean and bad. What Donald Trump actually says is, of course, uniformly good and correct. But sometimes if you just write it out and give it to people to see, they will not think so. Therefore, this is to be avoided.”

Read the piece here.