Study: Australians Want Morals Programmed Into AI

Study: Australians Want Morals Programmed Into AI
SHARE
THIS



Exponential advancements in automation and robotics are happening now, and whilst mostly useful to mankind, they have also spelt disaster in instances where control has been lost, resulting in accidents, injuries and more.

As humans, we will require to develop ways to manage AI when robots take on crucial roles (such as driving cars or machinery or executing highly complex medical procedures for example) that will allow them to make their own, potentially life-altering decisions.

Given the increasing use of robots and Artificial Intelligence (AI)  in decision-making, new research commissioned by think tank – Thinque, has revealed that 79 per cent of Australians believe that morals should be programmed into robots.

When probed further to understand who respondents believed should be responsible for programming morals into robots, 59 per cent said the original creator/software programmer, 20 per cent said the government, 12 per cent said the manufacturer and nine per cent said the company that owns them.

Global futurist and innovation strategist, Anders Sörman-Nilsson says, “As AI and its capabilities become more sophisticated, concerns around how we will manage these developments continue to grow. As such, the need for humans to build an ethical code into robots is necessary if they are to take on more key roles in our lives.

“This code must be instilled into robots and AI taking on important roles, such as machine engineers, or military personnel, to prevent adverse situations. If this is not executed well, we as humans will be opening ourselves up to inevitably dangerous consequences.

“With robots being allowed to exist in society without a moral compass, the capacity for them to hurt or fatally harm humans through not being able to make ethically sound decisions is imminent. As such, the U.S government recently announced its plans to spend millions on developing machines that understand moral consequence.

“The stakes are high for these kinds of robots and their ability to know right from wrong and make decisions accordingly is absolutely crucial, highlighting the very reason AI and its capabilities must be monitored carefully.

“In order to be able to effectively programme ethics into AI, humans will have to have a collective set of ethical rules universally agreed upon (a far cry from the current state of the human world).

“And another dilemma that improvements in AI raises is that once robots advance enough to mimic human intelligence, awareness and emotions, we will need to consider if they should then also be granted human-equivalent rights, freedoms and protections,” Anders adds.

With the future of AI unfolding rapidly and consumer fear evident, Anders shares his insights into what human citizens can expect to see from robotics companies when it comes to ethics in AI in the near future:

  1.       They will need to set clear ethical boundaries: As humans alongside robotics developers, must collectively determine ethical values that can be coded into and followed by robots. These values will need to encompass all potential ethical problems and the correct way to respond in each situation. For example, driverless cars will need to have an ethics algorithm to help determine for example, that if in an unimaginable circumstance such as a car carrying two children would be swerved and kill two elderly pedestrians in its wake rather than killing the children in a head-on collision, or not. Only then will we be able to design robots that can reason through ethical dilemmas the way humans would (and complicating matters, of course, is that humans cross-culturally don’t yet agree on these philosophical thought experiments at this point in time either!).
  2.       They will also have to factor in the unexpected: Even after we have set out boundaries to determine ethical behaviour, there will still be numerous ethical ways to handle each situation, as well as unexpected moral dilemmas. For example, a robot needing to make a decision of whether to stop on its way to deliver urgent medical supplies to a hospital to help an injured person it encounters on its way, or not. To ensure robots follow a moral code, as humans do, we would be wise to provide AI with different potential solutions to moral dilemmas and train them to evaluate and be able to make the best moral decision in any given situation.
  3. They will have to constantly monitor AI: As with any technology, programmers will need to ensure that they are constantly monitoring and evaluating ethics in AI so that they are up to date and making the very best decisions possible. Mistakes will inevitably be made, yet programmers should be doing everything possible to both prevent these, as well as redevelop ethical codes to ensure AI is as morally sound as it can be.

Please login with linkedin to comment

AI Ethics robots

Latest News

NGINX Launch Parodic “Investigative Reporter” Campaign Via The Misfits Media
  • Marketing
  • Media

NGINX Launch Parodic “Investigative Reporter” Campaign Via The Misfits Media

The latest NGINX campaign is live as The Misfits Media Company, and NGINX creates parodic ‘investigative reporter’ content with Dan Ilic on the streets of Sydney. The Misfits recently partnered with the APAC marketing team at NGINX to take an investigative deep dive into the world of mobile apps as the good, bad and (even) […]

Trade Publisher AMT Acquires Radio Today
  • Media

Trade Publisher AMT Acquires Radio Today

Trade publisher AMT Pty Ltd has announced the acquisition of Radio Today, the Australian media and marketing sector’s go-to source for radio news, analysis, ratings and jobs. AMT currently publishes Radioinfo in Australia & New Zealand, Asia and Africa, and was a key partner in bringing the annual Radiodays conference to Asia. Radio Today will continue to […]

MediaHub Australia Appoints Chief Operating Officer As Part Of Major Restructure
  • Media

MediaHub Australia Appoints Chief Operating Officer As Part Of Major Restructure

Mediahub Australia has made its most significant restructuring to date, as it positions itself to professionally manage the changing world of broadcast technology and consumer viewing habits. The most significant new appointment, and one of many, is Scott Jolly being promoted to the role of chief operating officer. As COO, Jolly now has full responsibility for the […]

Life In Lockdown: How The Trade Desk’s Melbourne Office Has Become One Of The Most Successful In The Business
  • Opinion
  • Technology

Life In Lockdown: How The Trade Desk’s Melbourne Office Has Become One Of The Most Successful In The Business

For Melbourne, the past 18 months have been largely dictated by the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdowns. Despite this, The Trade Desk has managed to establish one of its most successful offices. Here, The Trade Desk lead director, client strategy, Kali Guillas [pictured], explains how the Melbourne office has managed to thrive. We are in a […]

Opinion

by B&T Magazine

B&T Magazine
“I Do Sh*ts With More Backbone Than You!” Hannah Gadsby Calls Out Netflix Executive Over Dave Chappelle Comedy
  • Media

“I Do Sh*ts With More Backbone Than You!” Hannah Gadsby Calls Out Netflix Executive Over Dave Chappelle Comedy

Australian Comedian Hannah Gadsby has slammed Netflix executive, Ted Sarandos after he used Gadsby’s presence on the platform to defend Dave Chappelle’s new comedy special on Netflix.  Chappelle’s recent comedy special, The Closer, which debuted on Netflix last week, has been met with backlash, after Chappelle used his special to discuss transgender and gay people, […]

Samsung Launches First Branded Podcast In Partnership With Acast
  • Media

Samsung Launches First Branded Podcast In Partnership With Acast

Acast has announced its partnership with Samsung Electronics Australia to produce and distribute the company’s first branded podcast within the Australian market. The Rule Benders podcast will feature conversations with extraordinary Australians who have bent the rules, defied convention, and redefined what is possible. Rule Benders is a six-week branded podcast campaign, with a new […]

DocuSign Encourages Businesses To ‘Next Time, DocuSign’ In New Campaign Via Hardhat
  • Advertising
  • Campaigns

DocuSign Encourages Businesses To ‘Next Time, DocuSign’ In New Campaign Via Hardhat

DocuSign Australia this week unveils its first work with independent creative agency, Hardhat, encouraging people to ‘Next time, DocuSign’. Spearheading the campaign is an influencer series featuring entrepreneurial business leaders Janine Allis, Jules Jund and Emma Isaacs sharing stories of oversights and slip ups during important business deals. The three ‘That time I screwed up’ […]

Experience Design Agency Imagination Announces New Hires
  • Marketing

Experience Design Agency Imagination Announces New Hires

Global experience design agency Imagination, has expanded its Sydney team, with the appointment of two new key hires. Ashley Diamond (pictured below), with over 18 years experience across large scale events and broadcast quality content production, joins as project director to continue driving the growth of Imaginations’ largest clients. “The people, the work and the […]

Switch Appoints Matt Watson To Technical Director
  • Media
  • Technology

Switch Appoints Matt Watson To Technical Director

Switch, an award-winning digital agency has announced the appointment of Matt Watson as its technical director. Watson joins Switch at an exciting time as the business focuses on its growth strategy and bringing the best talent in the market to deliver exceptional outcomes for customers. Watson is the most recent talent appointment by Switch, after […]

Tis’ The Season To Turn Shoppers Into Buyers
  • Opinion
  • Technology

Tis’ The Season To Turn Shoppers Into Buyers

Hayley Fisher [pictured] is the AUNZ Country Manager at Adyen. In this op-ed, she discusses the upcoming holidays sales season and explains marketers can help drive sales. Over the 18-months the pace of ecommerce has accelerated to new heights. According to latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), a record $44.2 billion was […]

Opinion

by B&T Magazine

B&T Magazine