SBS’s The Cook Up With Adam Liaw Produces ‘Fewer CO2 Emissions Than Industry Average’

SBS’s The Cook Up With Adam Liaw Produces ‘Fewer CO2 Emissions Than Industry Average’

The public broadcaster is taking steps to measure the carbon footprint of its TV production in Australia in what it claims is an industry first. 

SBS has revealed that its TV program The Cook Up with Adam Liaw produces fewer carbon emissions than global industry standards.

In its sixth season, the show had its carbon footprint validated by the Albert Calculator – a tool that calculates and validates greenhouse gas emissions of TV productions and compares this with thousands of programs.

SBS is working with  Sustainable Screens Australia to measure the impact its business on Co2 emissions in an effort to become a net zero business by 2045.

At its Upfronts last October, SBS said it had already achieved net zero on its direct emissions (covering Scope 1 and 2), and is taking steps to reduce scope 3 emissions – those used by third party suppliers.

“The Cook Up with Adam Liaw recorded emission levels below international industry averages, demonstrating the work being done both behind and in front of the camera to lead in sustainability,” SBS director of television Kathryn Fink said.

“Not only does the show itself value and celebrate sustainable food and cooking practices, but our production crew have also made impactful changes to catering and transportation to minimise our carbon footprint.

“This is an important first step for this show and others to minimise emissions in production and set up the blueprint for our next shows in this process: Insight and Going Places with Ernie Dingo.”

The industry average in the UK – one of the more advanced markets in reducing carbon for TV – is 12.8 tonnes CO2-e per hour of film or TV produced.

To coincide with Earth Day, SBS Audio will launch the first two episodes of new podcast Everything We Need, which explores how regional communities are meeting the challenge of climate change.

From dust storms that completely darken towns in the middle of the day to extreme bushfire risk, the six-part series speaks to people experiencing the harsh realities of climate change. In Mildura, Victoria, one of Australia’s food bowls, climate champions and farmers talk about building a resilient future to secure food supply for locals and innovating a system of water trading.

The series will be free to stream on SBS On Demand as part of a new Earth Day Collection, comprised of documentaries and programs with a sustainability theme.




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