Customers ask Fitness First for 'real change'

Customers ask Fitness First for 'real change'

Fitness First's multi-million dollar brand upgrade has been met with cynicism by consumers on the company’s Facebook page.

The international revamp was announced yesterday as the gym empire moves to “reclaim their reputation” and ditch the negative “Finance First” moniker it has gained.

But the ‘change for the best’ rebrand has left some consumers wanting more: “So what are the real differences? I won’t go back unless there are substantial differences to how clients are treated.”

 “It’s not exciting, it’s a rebrand, wow. Give us real change, I don’t care what colour and font you use,” one Facebook user said referencing the brand’s new giant red ‘F’.

The supersized red ‘F’, which replaces the old blue logo, has also come under fire with B&T readers likening it to the Formula One logo.

“It is [sic] just me or does that logo look awfully similar to Formula One (the car racing mob not hotels).”

Another said: “oh dear it looks like formula one logo, looks like fitness first is trying to be virgin active by calling themselves a club when its [sic] actually a gym….nice try.”




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