The boy George breaks the 6000 mentions mark

The boy George breaks the 6000 mentions mark

In the short hours since the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge revealed the name of their new son – George Alexander Louis – there has been over 6000 mentions online in Australia, with one tweet every 1.5 minutes mentioning the new prince's full title.

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

However, in the lead up to the baby’s birth on July 22, there was very little news at hand about a possible name, so the internet was left to its own devices. While most of the online activity revolved around a due date, there was still speculation about the gender, with most predicting the Duchess would give birth to a girl. Of the 13,574 online mentions of the ‘Royal baby’ in Australia from July 1 to the day prior to the birth, 12% of talk was about a baby girl and 9% was about a baby boy.

In true Australian style, the most retweeted news about the Royal baby’s birth wasn’t actually any details of the child, but rather some jokes in relation to the new prince.

And while the announcement of the birth, and the happy family’s emergence from hospital finally provided some news, there was little in the aftermath before the naming to satisfy the information hungry public. So the internet-savvy took matters into their own hands, creating jokes and memes around the birth of the future king, including plenty of pop culture references.

Crunching the numbers based on Australian mentions since July 1, the latest edition to the royal nest has had 89,537 on social media. In terms of cultural memes to the event, The Lion King has received 1,085 mentions, Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince 11,062 mentions, while Game of Thrones has bagged 3,794. In terms of baby specifics, the name of the baby has had 10,268 mentions, while gender 12,575.

Meanwhile, as of lunchtime yesterday, the royal birth had scored a 62,669 mentions, while in the realm hashtags, the tag #welcometotheworld had left #royalbaby in the dust (29,944 mentions to just 151). Automated sentiment analysis showed that discussion is much more positive than negative (44% to 12%).