Digital Degustation

Digital Degustation

In The Future Eating Your Greens Looks Decidedly Different

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

Designed with an eye on a future where food might be scarce, this wearable system is a self-sustaining food generator for humans.  The bodice of the outfit uses photosynthesis to create algae that is in turn fed to the wearer via a tubular helmet. What was once science fiction is looking quite like a lot more like science fact. Check it out here

Traduction n'a jamais √©t√© plus simple 

Get ready to toss that French phrase book aside because Sigmo has your back.  Where Douglas Adams envisioned a little translating fish worn in the ear, Sigmo’s creation is a small pocket size device that claims to instantly translate speech for 25 languages.  The usefulness of such technology is outstanding, but so is the price listed on their indiegogo page RRP $65.

Looks Like Music

The interactive link between music, colour and pattern is a fascinating one, and this art installation by Yuri Suzuki allows audiences to explore for themselves how sounds and? colours can be manipulated to create interesting soundscapes.  The basis of this works in the creation of a circuit, which is read by a little travelling scanner robot: its path and the illustrated and scribbled obstacles it passes over are in turn interpreted as sounds and music.  Watch it here.

DO NOT Read This Article

DO NOT click on this link, and absolutely DO NOT, under any circumstances, visit the Amnesty International website where you will discover #ifoundtheletter.

Just don’t.

Tiny, Flexible Solar Panels

If in the future, as is expected, many more inanimate objects; buildings and walls are ‘connected’. Then one challenge faced is how they will be powered. It’s a task that researchers at Penn State and Rice University have been working on and have developed some very, small, thin and flexible solar panels.  And it’s this tech that will liberate all these connected sensors and what not, so they can communicate back to us all the unnecessary information we can ever never need to know about our environments. Find out more here