Digital Degustation

Digital Degustation

3D Printed Records and Music Piracy

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

With the help of 3D printing, digital music piracy has taken an analogue twist. Digital media tinkerer Amanda Ghassaei has developed a process that enables any MP3 to be printed on to plastic records and played on a turntable. Given it will only work with super high-res 3D printers and the audio is still horrible, it’s a long way off in-home use, but we suspect it won’t be long.

BookRX Recommends Books By Scanning Your Twitter Feed

A US PHD student from Northwestern University has created an innovative web app to help you discover new books. Called BookRX, the web app scans your twitter feed and bases its recommendations on your recurring tweet themes. It’s a surprise that none of the major online retailers have developed this previously. Try it here.

Vid 1: Would You Help a Drunk Get Into Their Car?

A UK insurance comparison company has released an online video campaign that tests the public to see how many people would help an inebriated individual into his car. Alarmingly, only 8 people out of 50 refused him entry. Good thing he was acting.

Vid 2: Subaru Collision Avoidance Demonstration

Subaru have created a clever video to demonstrate their “Eyesight” collision avoidance technology. Clocking up over 600K views in a little over a week, the video features a multitude of mini Subarus each fitted with the “Eyesight” technology and a musical tune that only activates when the car is moving. The video creates a symphony and showcases how the mini cars navigate each other once a single road block (holding them all back) is lifted.

The Nokia Open Song Project

A few months back Beck released a new song only in sheet music form – a clever move that spawned hundreds of public interpretations before his own version was released. Nokia, Naked Communications Copenhagen and Danish electro group Spleen have just teamed up to release ‘Hybernation’ in a similar manner. Called the Open Song Project, Nokia and Spleen have given people the various sample components of the song and asked them to create music with it – all without actually hearing the song. Each component (kick drum, synth, bass, etc.) is accompanied with video shot on the new Lumia 920, so when each part is stitched together a video clip is automatically made.