ADMA offers alternative to mandatory reporting

ADMA offers alternative to mandatory reporting

ADMA has revealed that it has offered to work with the Privacy Commissioner on a new voluntary Code that establishes clear benchmarks for reporting privacy data breaches.

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

The Code would replace the current unenforceable Data Breach Notification Guide of the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner and is an alternative to the “Privacy Alerts” legislation now before a Senate Committee.

The offer comes as a Senate Committee begins its hurried review of the “Privacy Alerts” Bill. The Committee must give its report Monday 24 June.

It would deal with key issues including the definition of  ‘serious data breach’ so that business know clearly when to report an error, benchmarks for different kinds of data issues  including cyber-attacks, hacking  and other external threat, and third party monitoring, auditing and enforcement.

The offer comes as a Senate Committee begins its hurried review of the “Privacy Alerts” Bill. The Committee must give its report Monday 24 June.

“Our proposal is consistent with the Government’s commitment to supporting innovation in the digital, data-driven economy,” said ADMA CEO Jodie Sangster (pictured).

ADMA, along with many other business groups, is trying to stop the Government from ramming through the “Privacy Alerts” bill. The proposed regime, which comes on top of major changes to the Privacy Act, will be an administrative nightmare for medium and large businesses. It will cripple innovation in Australia’s data-driven economy.

“We are saying to the Government, don’t do this to Australian business; give voluntary reporting another chance,” said Ms Sangster.