Rival Of Failed Tech Start-up Buzinga Offers To Lend A Hand To Affected Clients & Staff

Rival Of Failed Tech Start-up Buzinga Offers To Lend A Hand To Affected Clients & Staff

Melbourne-based mobile app development and digital company Appscore has offered to provide support to existing customer and staff of rival Buzinga, after the company went into liquidation.

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

Buzinga has left creditors $250,000 out of pocket, with liquidator BK Taylor & Co confirming to Business Insider Australia that the company entered into liquidation last week and is no longer operating.

Furthermore, Buzinga, has allegedly left 22 employees without jobs and clients with incomplete projects and facing substantial losses.

In response, Appscore has reached out to clients with the offer of a free consultation to assess where their project is at and provide a plan to successfully complete unfinished work.

The company is also open to speaking with staff and potentially offering employment where the opportunity is available.

Appscore managing director and co-founder Alex Louey said: “It’s never good to see businesses go under, especially when you consider the toll of their staff and clients.

“Appscore has been in business for seven years and are currently in a strong phase of growth. We want to help those affected by this situation even though our books are full. Our team are ready to assist anyone who may have questions about their ongoing services or employment.”

Sydney-based mobile app development and digital company Super App Bros has also offered to support any existing clients of Buzinga whose projects may be in limbo.

“We’re offering free consultations to any clients affected by the unfortunate situation,” the company said in a statement.

Meanwhile, Grant Hull, co-founder and CEO of Adelaide-based digital innovation firm Enabled, said Buzinga’s failure is a reminder for businesses to re-evaluate their criteria in engaging with app and software developers.

“We continue to rescue app and software development projects at a rate of two to three per year,” he said.

“This worries me, as it means a lot more people out there are still being lured by sub-par developers who only deliver grandiose promises, lofty claims and a good dose of blind optimism.”

Hull said signs to watch out for include a multitude of award nominations with no wins, weak or aging portfolios with no client testimonials, and an emphasis on agile speed without solid strategies or thought leadership.