Spotify Forced To Apologise For Controversial Spotify Settings

Spotify Forced To Apologise For Controversial Spotify Settings

The release of Spotify’s new privacy policy got a social media beating over the weekend after it was revealed the music streaming site would have greater access to consumer’s personal details.

Posted by ERIN MARY Doyle

In the new privacy policy, Spotify would have access to user’s photos, video, mobile device location, voice controls and contacts. Here are some of the highlights of the privacy policy which came into effect on the 19th August:

“With your permission, we may collect information stored on your mobile device, such as contacts, photos, or media files.

“Depending on the type of device that you use to interact with the Service and your settings, we may also collect information about your location based on, for example, your phone’s GPS location or other forms of locating mobile devices (e.g., Bluetooth). We may also collect sensor data (e.g., data about the speed of your movements, such as whether you are running, walking, or in transit).

“You may integrate your Spotify account with Third Party Applications. If you do, we may receive similar information related to your interactions with the Service on the Third Party Application, as well as information about your publicly available activity on the Third Party Application. This includes, for example, your “Like”s and posts on Facebook.”

Twitter erupted with angry users:

Within 24 hours of the release, Spotify’s CEO Daniel Ek had to clarify that the privacy settings would allow ‘individual opt-outs.’

“We are in the middle of rolling out new terms and conditions and privacy policy and they’ve caused a lot of confusion about what kind of information we access and what we do with it. We apologize for that. We should have done a better job in communicating what these policies mean and how any information you choose to share will – and will not – be used.

“Let me be crystal clear here: If you don’t want to share this kind of information, you don’t have to. We will ask for your express permission before accessing any of this data – and we will only use it for specific purposes that will allow you to customize your Spotify experience.”

Ek said Spotify had heard the concerns loud and clear, and would be updating the policy to better reflect their intentions.