Ratchet Up The Risk If You Want Great Customer Experience

Ratchet Up The Risk If You Want Great Customer Experience

To deliver a great customer experience brands need to “be risky and push the boundaries” says Krux ANZ country manager Jo Gaines.

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

‘Customer experience’ is almost an abused term these days. Everyone’s talking about it yet only a handful of companies are actually getting their CX bob on – and Jo Gaines, country manager ANZ for data management platform Krux, says brands need to experiment.

Gaines, who is speaking at Daze of Disruption in Melbourne today, told B&T that Facebook has made some massive faux pas, but it is still pushing the boundaries.

“They sometimes get it wrong,” said Gaines. “I think most of us have had that experience but clearly a brand like Facebook can risk more than a smaller brand who doesn’t have quite the same level of engagement or relationship with their audience. By pushing the boundaries you’re going to make some of these mistakes but brands like Facebook can afford to be risky, whereas companies who are not experiencing the same level of growth as they once used to, often don’t feel as confident experimenting and taking similar risks.”

Recently there have been concerns about privacy from many B2C brands and having to be across the latest regulations can be overwhelming, but Gaines says that’s a bit of a “cop-out”, and it can be executed without being creepy.

“It doesn’t even have to be on a one-to-one basis,” she added. “You just put people into groups and speak to them based on where they fit, what they are interested in and what they need. The concerns that some brands might have is, ‘What if what I’ve been doing to date, hasn’t actually been driving the results that I thought it was?’ or ‘What if I get the message wrong?’ but there are bucket loads of opportunities, because not a lot of people are doing this yet.

“I’m coming at it from the data side – the data and then the creative messaging. The frustrating thing for me as a consumer is that if/when brands know me, they have a relationship with me; I’m a customer, a repeat customer and they don’t use what they know about me to communicate in a more relevant way with me.”

Citing Telecommunications providers as an example, she said if someone is already a customer, don’t serve them new offers for new phones and new contracts when they’re just three months into a contract, as it’s clearly not something they would be interested in.

Most brands, agencies and publishers use a data management platform to pull in all their data from websites, mobile devices, social, basically anywhere they’re collecting information about the customers and their users.

They then use what they know about the audience to drive a better relationship and more engagement with them via content – and Gaines says companies are now thinking about using these systems to drive advertising experiences, but are unsure what kind of interaction they should be having on a users’ device, and should the interaction with them be different on a mobile or a tablet or a desktop?

“We work with a bunch of brands who use our platform purely for content personalisation,” she added. “They’re really smart brands who are saying “I want to keep my current customers happy. Sure, I’m interested in finding new customers, but I want to keep my existing customers content so I’m going to make sure that what they have with me on any device, on any platform is right based on what I know about them.’”

Gaines believes retail and automotive are two verticals that are fairly sophisticated, but have lots of room to move, but says travel is ripe for this type of opportunity.

“If I’m a consumer and I’m looking at one site for flights,” she explained, “and I looked at accommodation somewhere else and a different site for activities and events, if I’m a brand and I’m looking at one of those things in isolation, I’m not getting the full picture.

“So I’m able to see, ‘Hey I’m someone who is looking at flights, looking at accommodation, looking at activities, I’ve actually now booked my accommodation,’ so I’m no longer just a dreamer when it comes to looking at flights. I’m actively looking for flights, I need flights. If they gave me a really great offer, I’d probably book.

“Whereas if you are only looking at these as a person looking at flights in isolation and you just saw me bouncing around looking at different flight options, you may think I’m just dreaming about travel. But if you see the whole picture, you know I’m serious, I’ve actually booked accommodation.”