Poll Reveals What Journalists Fear the Most

Poll Reveals What Journalists Fear the Most
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A global poll of journalists from 52 countries has identified declining ad revenues as the profession’s number one concern. Staff cuts came second and the dreaded “fake news” came in at third.

The poll was conducted by German press organisation Impressum and asked respondents the three questions below:

  1. In one word, what defines journalism in your country right now?
  2. Please can you give us a quote, talking not to the government, nor to your colleagues or bosses, but to the greater public, on why people should care about protecting the freedom of press.
  3. What do you think is the biggest threat to journalism today?

Answers from Oceania reportedly came from journalists in Australia and New Zealand and the full results are shown in the graphics below.

What do you think is the biggest threat to journalism today?

Screen Shot 2018-12-11 at 2.36.31 pmIn one word, what defines journalism in your country right now?

Screen Shot 2018-12-11 at 2.37.41 pm

Screen Shot 2018-12-11 at 2.38.16 pm

Screen Shot 2018-12-11 at 2.38.26 pm

Some quotes quotes on why people should care about protecting the freedom of press.

Sydney’s The Daily Telegraph’s Martin Newman said: “Press freedom is essential for an as-close-to honest portrait of the world as we can have. It does not, however, exclude the press from being critically analysed by other bodies and held to account for ignorant or misleading reports.”

Don Munro from The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation added: “Ever play the children’s game “Kerplunk”? Freedom of the press is like the toothpicks. Remove them and all the marbles fall, everything falls apart. And the game’s over.”

Kurt Strand from Danish radio station P1 said: “Freedom of press is fundamentally for a democracy, and you shall not take it for granted with current government attacks i many countries, cuts in economy for public service media and the overwhelming competition from tech giants.”

While the deputy editor of France’s L’Express, Eric Mettout, added: “Because people need to be informed as fully as possible to fully exercise their right to know and their right of choice. It’s an individual and collective right. It’s democracy.”

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