Facebook challenges Twitter's live TV interactions

Facebook challenges Twitter's live TV interactions

Facebook has today released its first white paper since its SecondSync partnership was announced and the global TV chatter study has “important commercial implications”.

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

The study, which covers Australia, the US and the UK, found that 60% of interactions on Facebook about a TV show occur during the program’s airing.

The report said the finding was significant as it challenges the assumption that TV-related Facebook interactions happen outside of the broadcast and the belief that Twitter owns the real-time TV chatter.

“When looked at holistically, real-time activity around TV and sport on the Facebook platform is hugely compelling and there are important commercial implications,” Graham Lovelace, non-executive director SecondSync Limited, said.

“Audience measurement, TV planning, content discovery, direct response advertising, TV commissioning and research are just some of the sectors that will benefit from the insights coming out of the world’s biggest social network.”

The study looked at the four different types of Facebook interactions (posts, comments, likes and shares) and found “each type exhibited distinct repeating patterns of engagement”.

Posts are most closely aligned with real-time TV events and the majority of TV-related Facebook conversations occur in the comments section of posts.

Likes have the longest tail of engagement as fans continue to engage with posts after the show has concluded. Shares are the least used type of TV interaction.

Different genres of programs have distinct patterns of engagement:

Sport is huge driver of interaction on Facebook with this year’s Super Bowl generating 185 million interactions from 50 million unique users.

Smaller events also generate significant chatter with controversial officiating decisions and the end of the game drivers of large interaction spikes on the network.

To see the full report click here.

This is the first time Facebook has made its social TV data publicly available and comes after the social giant announced a partnership with Uk-based Second Sync last week.