Aussies Continue To Flog Stuff Off The Internet Reveals New Study

Aussies Continue To Flog Stuff Off The Internet Reveals New Study

New research conducted by the Australian and UK Governments shows Australia has high levels of online copyright infringement that reinforce the need for international and industry cooperation to address piracy.

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

Both countries conducted surveys between March and May this year to measure online copyright infringement across different content types, with the Australian research closely modelled on the UK approach, which has been running since 2012.

The Australian survey carried out 2,630 interviews and found nearly half (43 per cent) of Australians who had consumed digital content in the period surveyed had consumed at least one of those files illegally, compared to only a fifth in the UK. The UK survey identified an increase in the take up of legal services since 2013.


Percentage of survey respondents who consumed online content of which at least one item of content was consumed illegally in the last three months









TV programmes



Video games




The results highlight the importance of international collaboration to help understand the reasons for online copyright infringement, establish benchmarks, and share solutions.

The results also underscore the importance of governments working with industry to address infringement issues, and that a range of measures are needed to properly tackle the problem.

The Australian survey found people would likely stop infringing if legal content was: cheaper (39 per cent), more available (38 per cent), and had the same release date as other countries (36 per cent). Some 43 per cent of internet users stated that they were not confident of what is legal online content.

Recent amendments to the Copyright Act 1968, which enable the blocking of infringing overseas websites, and complement the Copyright Notice Scheme Industry Code that is currently being developed by both rights holders and internet service providers, are part of the solution. However, rights holders’ most powerful tool to combat online copyright infringement is making content accessible, timely and affordable to consumers.