Almost Half Of Adland Agree That Men In The Industry Get Paid More

Almost Half Of Adland Agree That Men In The Industry Get Paid More

One of the more startling statistics to come out of B&T’s recent online salary survey was that 48 per cent of the 1000-plus respondents agreed that men got paid more than women in the media and advertising industries.

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

Respondents to the survey were 60-40 in favour of females, with 35 per cent saying they didn’t believe it was true and 17 per cent saying they didn’t know.

The full results of the survey are to be released in the upcoming print edition of B&T due to hit desks next week.

When it came to boss’s salaries, 26 per cent said they believed their boss was overpaid considering the work they did, 36 per cent believed they were paid fairly, while 38 per cent said they did not know.

Unsurprisingly many respondents griped about their pay packets particularly when it came to the education commitments and hours required of media jobs.

Despite concerns around pay, over half – some 55 per cent – agreed there was a talent shortage in the media, advertising, marketing industries. While just shy of 50 per cent said poor pay (and attracting better talent) could be improved if clients were charged more.

Interestingly, many respondents griped about the pay and conditions of their current employer, however, most admitted they weren’t actively looking for another job elsewhere. Some 14 per cent admitted “every headhunter in town has their resume”, while 11 per cent said they were looking but no one was hiring. The rest appeared simply too lazy to look around.

When it came to asking for a pay rise, many respondents said business conditions were simply to fragile at the moment to ask for one.

Commenting on the survey results, B&T’s editor in chief, David Hovenden, said: “When we set the survey live we expected some robust outcomes to come of it and that’s certainly what we got. Worryingly, there is still a strong perception in the industry about men getting paid more. As well, the number of younger respondents, the Ys, appeared mostly unhappy with their pay and conditions.

“I’m not sure if it’s just another example of disgruntled but ambitious young people or it should be ringing some alarm bells regarding things like training, advancement and staff turnover for agencies,” he said.

The October/November edition of B&T is out next week.