Study: Aussie Millennials Going Off The Booze

Study: Aussie Millennials Going Off The Booze

Following last month’s report on B&T that more and more Aussies are choosing a vegetarian lifestyle comes a new report that says we’re going off the booze too – particularly among younger Australians.

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Australians drank 10.8 litres of pure alcohol in 2008/2009, however, that’s dropped to 9.7 litres in 2013/20014.

However, the biggest fall in drinking rates was amongst teenagers. The report found that drinking rates among the group had halved from 56 per cent to just 28 per cent.

Risky drinking – more than four drinks in a session at least once a month – dropped from 17 per cent in 2005 to 8.7 per cent in 2013.

The exact reason for the decline in drinking rates is unclear but its believed a healthier lifestyle could be the main contributor. Things like lockout laws and a rise in immigrants from countries without a drinking culture could also have contributed.

Another reason could simply be the cost of booze. “Research shows increasing the price of alcohol, restricting trading hours and reducing outlet density can have positive outcomes in reducing consumption and harms related to alcohol use,” the report noted.

When it came to the Ys turning off alcohol, it could be a case of them not wanting to emulate their parents.

In response to the report, National Drug Research Institute alcohol expert Steve Allsop was quoted on as saying: “There is a generational thing where teenagers don’t want to be like their parents.

“Some young people have been affected by images of drunkenness and violence, and they don’t want to be in that space.

“More teenagers have become aware of the health consequences, and sport is really important to them. Also, we’re seeing more young people living at home for longer, with very little financial independence, and they might behave quite differently than if they lived in a shared house,” Allsop told