The Lorna Jane Furore Is More Reason Why Brands Need Social Media Fans

The Lorna Jane Furore Is More Reason Why Brands Need Social Media Fans
SHARE
THIS



As sports retailer Lorna Jane’s employee woes roll on, in this opinion piece Nicole Reaney, brand expert and director of InsideOut PR, says the whole affair is yet another example of why brands should build a loyal army via social media…

Lorna Jane has found herself in the public domain once again, with another ex-employee revealing her negative experience to the Courier Mail, saying she was used by the organisation. The employee also commented on the founder’s Sunday night’s 60 Minutes interview, “And that’s where I call bullshit and claim “crocodile tears”.

nicole-reaney

The company’s social media operator immediately published the company’s response to the article, stating it was not given the opportunity to respond to the media and using the social platform to communicate its viewpoint.

Unfortunately as companies grow and particularly successful retail companies with a national footprint and a demographic of heavy social users, they become easy targets for public backlash, and one negative story or experience can trigger more people to voice their side.

A common frustration by companies is also the lack of control of a story being published or aired in media without their opportunity to comment. The Lorna Jane team rightly used its own power in social media to take a little control back in the brand messages being received by the public.

While I would commend the team for using the platform to share their side, they need to ensure that their tone and messaging is not too defensive or passive aggressive. They are a positive brand and they want their voice to align with the brand’s culture. Even if a company disagrees with what’s been presented to the public, there’s a way to voice your messages in a more humble, succinct way, where consumers see the genuine side of the company. Managed carefully you can even turn around what was initially a negative impact to your brand, to it becoming more popular with loyal customers banding to support the organisation. That’s where social self-regulation occurs and the public become your brand ambassadors. Much more powerful than a company projecting it’s messages solely.

The Lorna Jane brand has a strong, positive following and is a strong positive brand. However I’d caution the organisation, they just need to be careful that they don’t start to build pockets of ‘hate-communities’.

Latest News

RedBalloon Urges Shoppers To ‘Break With Tradition’ This Christmas
  • Advertising
  • Campaigns
  • Marketing

RedBalloon Urges Shoppers To ‘Break With Tradition’ This Christmas

Online experience retailer RedBalloon is urging consumers to ‘break with tradition’ this Christmas and rethink their approach to gifting, with a million-dollar campaign set to drive 1.6 purchases every minute between now and December 25. RedBalloon General Manager Matthew Cavalier said everyone has their own traditions at Christmas. The brand’s creative territory is about celebrating […]

Rimmel London & The Cybersmile Foundation Take On Beauty Cyberbullying
  • Advertising
  • Campaigns

Rimmel London & The Cybersmile Foundation Take On Beauty Cyberbullying

Rimmel London has partnered up with The CyberSmile Foundation to take a stand against Beauty Cyberbullying. Launched on Monday via a global campaign #IWillNotBeDeleted, fronted by Rita Ora and Cara Delevigne with a cast of other individuals who have been affected by this issue. In 2017, Rimmel London undertook a global research study to understand […]

Jeep & Lumo Energy Launch OOH Campaigns Via oOh!media
  • Advertising
  • Campaigns
  • Media

Jeep & Lumo Energy Launch OOH Campaigns Via oOh!media

Jeep Australia and Lumo Energy are among an increasing number of brands creating impact and driving greater audience engagement through the use of special builds and innovative lighting on classic out of home billboards. The two builds, developed and executed by oOh! include strategically placed lighting which appears to increase in luminance as the night gets darker, to capture the attention […]