Study: Video Advertising Outperforms Desktop Display For Viewability

Study: Video Advertising Outperforms Desktop Display For Viewability

The viewability of video advertising has outperformed desktop display for the first time globally, according to the latest Media Quality Report by Integral Ad Science (IAS).

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

According to the report, display viewability in Australia grew slightly from 49.3 per cent in the first half of 2016 to 51.9 per cent in the second half.

Furthermore, video advertising outperformed desktop display for the first time globally. Most notably, video viewability showed significant improvement during the six-month period, increasing from 40 per cent to 58.2 per cent, while the completion rate in view increased from 26.7 per cent to 35.1 per cent.

IAS’s analysis of Australia showed the percentage of brand safety infractions fell from 12.7 per cent in H1 to 5.0 per cent in H2 for impressions on all buy types flagged on objectionable content.

When analysing Australian programmatic buys, the improvement is even greater, with the risk decreasing from 12.7 per cent to 5.4 per cent during the period.

Globally, display brand risk fell from 7.8 per cent during the first half of 2016 to 6.8 per cent during the second half, and video brand risk improved, down from 11.2 per cent overall to 8.9 per cent.

When analysing rates of ad fraud, a stark difference was found between campaigns using ad fraud prevention and those that did not.

For advertisers that are utilising prevention technology, ad fraud was found to be 0.1 per cent, compared to 2.9 per cent when no fraud prevention measures were taken.

Additional key insights from the report show homepages are found to attract higher rates of ad fraud – 88 per cent higher than article-specific pages.

The report also incorporated its first ever consumer level insights, revealing that for most campaigns, the vast majority of consumers are underexposed, 70 to 85 per cent of consumers are served no more than one viewable impression, and 50 to 65 per cent of consumers are exposed to the ads for a total of five seconds or less.