Nissan stands up to Ad Standards

Nissan stands up to Ad Standards

Nissan has been forced to tame down the cinema, online, TV and pay TV ads for its Nissan Pulsar Hatch after the Ad Standards Bureau upheld complaints about the childbirth race spot.

B&T Magazine
Posted by B&T Magazine

The brand however has only made modifications in “good faith” and is seeking an independent review of the board’s decision.

The ad in question features a woman who appears heavily pregnant encouraging the driver to pick up his pace. When the come to a stop outside a hospital, the tyres screech, the man looks at his watch and says, “Ten twenty four! Personal best!”

The woman than lifts her jumper to remove her fake pregnancy bump.

The ads attracted criticism from consumers for appearing to endorse unsafe driving.

One complainant said:  “I would recommend all these involved in the making and promotion of these ads visit the accident trauma centre at the Alfred.”

“The ad is irresponsible,” said another.

“The ad appears to contradict the advices given by road safety officials who warn that speed kills and in emergency situations drivers should drive with caution,” read another complaint.

Nissan said the focus of the advertisement is not on speed “but rather highlights its manoeuvrability and practicality in a real world environment and conditions”.

“The quick cuts between shots, the car driving away from the camera and loud engine noises (a feature of the turbo engine that is included in the Pulsar SSS Hatch shown in the advertisement) are all designed to highlight the manoeuvrability of the Pulsar SSS Hatch, and its adaptation to a tight urban environment.

“Nissan can confirm that the actual vehicle shown in the advertisement was driving within the speed limit at all times and in accordance with all applicable road rules.”

The changes Nissan has agreed to make to its ad include the words “quick, quick, quick, quick” and “go, go, go” being removed from the female voiceover.

The loud engine noise will also be decreased, the screech or “squeaking noise” that is heard when the vehicle stops outside the hospital has been removed. An on screen statement stating that the ad was filmed under controlled conditions has also been added.